Tag: easy

Quick, Easy, Turkish Eggplant Casserole

Quick, Easy, Turkish Eggplant Casserole

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This dish is similar to eggplant parmesan but without the cheese and without as much work. It is, however, as delicious as that Italian favorite. And a dash of cinnamon sends it to another world.

 

Tomato sauce in a frying pan
The tomato sauce is pretty easy to make. Use a box of chopped tomatoes.

 

This is a take on the classic Turkish dish, Imam Bayildi (which translates to “the imam fainted”). The classic dish is a stuffed eggplant but here you slice the eggplant and then layer it instead.

 

Eggplant slices on a cookie sheet
Brush the eggplant slices with some olive oil and bake them in a hot (425 degree) oven.

 

Other casserole versions of this recipe call for frying the eggplant and if you do that you can get away with using just one pan to create this dish. However, I found that baking the eggplant slices is just as good and probably less calories. It does, however, require you dirty an additional two cookie sheets.

 

Turkish eggplant casserole with salad
Slices of this pair well with a simple arugula salad.

 

The Bitter Myth of Eggplant

Most eggplant recipes tell you to salt the eggplant slices to get the bitter juices out. I’ve found this to be a myth and contrary to popular belief believe salting it may actually add some bitterness.

 

Eggplant with stripes
I know there are plenty of grandmothers out there who recommend salting eggplant but this only makes the eggplant mushy.

 

I’ve found that the best way to avoid making bitter eggplant is by carefully selecting the eggplant. Look for one that is a dark, purplish/black color. It should be firm without any scarring and without any soft spots. Next, I recommend peeling the eggplant, leaving purple vertical stripes.

 

Eggplant dish in pan
If you use a cast iron skillet to make the sauce you can layer the eggplant in it and then bake it in the oven (using only one pan).

 

I based this recipe on one I found on the “Feed Me Phoebe” blog. Phoebe describes herself as a gluten-free chef, obsessed with finding the sweet spot between health and hedonism. And I can attest that this casserole feels very indulgent while you’re eating it.

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Quick, Easy, Turkish Eggplant Casserole (Imam Bayildi)

November 30, 2018
: 20 min
: 1 hr
: 1 hr 20 min
: Easy

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 large eggplant or two medium eggplants (I don’t salt it as recommended in the original recipe as I believe that makes it more acidic. Instead, be careful to select a very firm eggplant with little or no blemishes. The color should be a deep purple. And then peel it vertically in strips so that it looks like it has thin purple stripes before you slice it into 1/4-inch slices, horizontally.
  • Sea salt, 1/2 teaspoon
  • Olive oil. Use a good grade regular frying-style olive oil, not extra-virgin
  • 1 small yellow onion, diced
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon red chili flakes
  • Dash of cinnamon
  • About 27 oz of diced tomatoes from a can or box.
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley, divided in half
Directions
  • Step 1 Take eggplant slices and brush olive oil on both sides. Put them on a cookie sheet that has been drizzled with a little olive oil (to prevent sticking).
  • Step 2 Bake slices in batches on two cookie sheets. When one side has turned brown, flip them over the bake on the other side. This should take about 10-15 minutes per batch.
  • Step 3 Heat a little olive oil in a cast iron skillet.
  • Step 4 Add onion to skillet and cook until soft (about 5 minutes). Add the garlic, chili flakes, 1/2 teaspoon sea salt and cinnamon. Cook for one minute more, until fragrant. Carefully pour in the tomatoes and simmer until thickened slightly, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in half the parsley.
  • Step 5 Remove most of the tomato sauce from the pan, leaving only a thin layer (about 1/4 cup) spread evenly over the bottom. Add one layer of the eggplant in the pan over the sauce and then top with more sauce. Continue to add layers of eggplant and sauce, as if you were building a lasagna.
  • Step 6 Cover with foil and cook in the oven for about 45 minutes until eggplant is soft and sauce is reduced. Garnish with remaining parsley and let it rest for about 10 minutes before slicing it. You can serve it warm or at room temperature.

Ma’s Stuffed Peppers

(Above: Watch the video to see how these are made. This is an easy recipe and the kids like them too.) (more…)

Quick, Easy Nutella Cookies

Quick, Easy Nutella Cookies

Get a free Rootsliving eCookbook with “5 Recipes to Help you Stay Healthy
and Lose Weight.”  

My friend Antoinette (who was born in Italy and is one of the best cooks I know) brought these to my house for a dinner party. They’re so good, it’s hard to stop eating them. And then when she told me how easy and fast they are to make I had to try it.

 

Nutella on a wonton wrapper and a spoon
All you need is a 1/4 teaspoon of Nutella for each cookie, maybe even a little less.

 

These cookies can be made well in advance. The cookies come out crunchy and sweet. And it’s very hard to stop eating them.

With only three ingredients — wonton wrappers, Nutella, and vegetable oil — these are a breeze to make. You put a dab of Nutella in the middle of a wonton wrapper and then fold it over so you have a triangle. Then you press down on the edges, being sure to get any air bubbles out.

 

A jar of nutella and some uncooked cookies.
Nutella is a chocolate and hazelnut spread, very popular in Italy.

 

Some other recipes recommend sealing the edges with a beaten egg, but I found this wasn’t necessary. I also suggest making up a bunch of these before you start deep frying because the frying goes very quickly and you need to pay attention so that the cookies don’t burn.

 

Nutella cookies frying
Pour about 1/2 inch of oil in a good frying pan and don’t take your eyes of the cookies.

 

Be sure to control the heat too. You don’t want the oil to start smoking. If you see it start to do that quickly turn down the heat or even remove the pan from the flame (if you’re cooking with gas). You want the oil to remain clean and you want the cookies to be lightly brown.

 

Nutella cookies draining on a paper towel.
Transfer the cookies from the frying pan to a plate lined with a paper napkin so they can drain.

 

One final note: I always believed there were many similarities and/or opportunities to blend Italian cooking with Chinese cooking and this recipe proves it.

(Thanks for reading this far. To show our appreciation we’re offering this free eCookbook with “5 Recipes to Help you Stay Healthy and Lose Weight,”  along with free subscription to the Rootsliving newsletter.)

Quick, Easy Nutella Cookies

September 20, 2018
: Easy

You can make these at a moment's notice and are great to bring to a party. Just be sure to keep a close eye on them so they don't burn.

By:

Ingredients
  • Nutella (buy a small jar)
  • Wonton wrappers
  • Powdered Sugar
  • Vegetable oil
Directions
  • Step 1 Put a dab of Nutella (less than a teaspoon will do) into the middle of a wonton wrapper. Fold the wrapper over so that it creates a triangle. Press down the edges until they stick.
  • Step 2 Heat about an inch or so of vegetable oil over high heat in a good skillet (I used a cast iron skillet).
  • Step 3 Drop three or four wonton cookies into the oil and cook on each side for about 30 seconds or less (just until light golden brown). Remove cookies to a plate lined with paper towels so the oil can drain.
  • Step 4 Put cookies on a platter and sprinkle powdered sugar over both sides. I used a sieve to sprinkle the sugar evenly.

 

Our Signature Dish: Root Soup

Our Signature Dish: Root Soup

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and Lose Weight.”  

I’ve always loved vichyssoise soup (served warm) and decided one day to build on that. The result is this soup.

This is the signature dish of Rootsliving. It encompasses everything that Rootsliving is about: it’s simple, uses fresh ingredients of the season, is healthy (so healthy it should ward off the flu) and delicious. And although I invented this dish, I don’t believe I’m the first person to put these ingredients together in a soup.

This is a soup that someone could have made hundreds of years ago, perhaps using the only ingredients they had available. It’s peasant food, created out of necessity and passed down from generation to generation because it’s that good. It stands the test of time. Most of the recipes here are in that category. And I hope I’m not being too indulgent by saying I believe this soup is in that special class.

BONUS: Good, hearty food doesn’t have to be fattening. If you leave out the cream and butter in this recipe, it’s low-calorie. And, if you substitute water for the chicken stock, it’s just as good and zero points for you Weight Watchers out there.

 

Overview of a bowl of soup
The carrots make this soup a bright orange color and sweet.

 

This would make a great first course at Thanksgiving dinner, or any holiday dinner. I serve it on special occasions but also make it a few times a month during the winter to help build up our immune systems. And if you have young children who don’t like to eat vegetables, this is a great way to get some in them.

 

Chopped up vegetables in a soup pot
What could be easier than throwing everything into a pot?

 

The prep for this soup involves lots of chopping, but once that work is done, you just throw everything into a big pot and cook.

 

Leeks on a cutting board.
Don’t let these hairy root vegetables scare you. Put them in their place.

 

If you’ve never cooked with leeks before, don’t fret. They’re big, but not scary. Consider them gigantic scallions if that makes you feel better and treat them the same. Chop off the squiggly roots at the bottom and chop off the leafy greens at the top. Then split them down the middle so you can wash them under a running faucet to get the dirt out.

 

Leeks, sliced down the middle.
That’s better. Part of taming these wild vegetables is cutting off the tops and bottoms and slicing them down the middle so you can clean them properly.

 

After the vegetables are soft, you let the mixture cool down (for at least an hour or so) and then working batches you puree it in a blender.

 

Soup in a blender
WARNING: Make sure the soup has cooled down before putting it in a blender. You don’t want to burn yourself or others if some spurts out the top.

 

Return the pureed soup back into the big pot and heat it up on the stove. Add some milk or heavy cream if you like (this is optional), some butter (also optional), and just a dash of nutmeg. Be careful, nutmeg is very strong. You can always add more if you like but you can’t take it out once it’s in the pot.

 

Orange soup in a bowl
Hearty, rich and sweet, just like you.

 

You can serve it as a first course, or as main course with some crusty bread and a salad. This is a great winter warmer and will soon become part of your comfort food DNA.

(Thanks for reading this far. To show our appreciation we’re offering this free eCookbook with “5 Recipes to Help you Stay Healthy and Lose Weight,”  along with free subscription to the Rootsliving newsletter.)

 

Root Soup

November 4, 2009
: 20 min
: 45 min
: 1 hr 5 min
: Medium

By:

Ingredients
  • 6 leeks (chop off the roots and leaves
  • use just the white and light green part, discard the rest.)
  • 5 cups diced potatoes
  • 3 cups diced sweet potatoes
  • 3 cups diced carrots
  • 8-10 cups chicken stock
  • Salt (to taste)
  • Dash of nutmeg (Nutmeg is strong so use no more than 1/8 teaspoon.)
  • Butter (1-2 tablespoons, or less)
  • Heavy cream (About 1/4 cup)
Directions
  • Step 1 Put everything in a pot (except for the nutmeg, butter and heavy cream) and bring to a boil.
  • Step 2 Lower heat and simmer, covered loosely for about 20-30 minutes or until vegetables are soft.
  • Step 3 Wait until ingredients cool and then puree in a blender in batches (if ingredients are still warm or hot, be careful not to burn yourself).
  • Step 4 Heat up soup, add nutmeg, butter and the heavy cream (don’t let it boil.)
  • Step 5 Serve with a crusty bread (french, ciabatta, italian etc.)