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Tag: herb

The Best Italian Herb You Never Heard Of

The Best Italian Herb You Never Heard Of

Nepitella completes the trifecta of Italian herbs that are a must-have in any Tuscan kitchen. Some describe it as a cross between oregano and mint, but I believe it’s more like a cross between basil and mint. And here’s why:

A bunch of nepitella hanging to dry.
(Nepitella, drying out after being harvested.)

When I cook, I like to think about music. I often have music playing (and a glass of wine poured) but I’m not talking now about the music I’m listening to. Instead I like to think about bass notes and treble notes or low notes and high notes.

Different flavors elicit different types of notes. Example: salt would be a high note and black pepper would be a low note or bass note. When cooking a red sauce, I often strive to have the flavors balanced between high and low. And adding dried oregano pushes the sauce into the high-note territory and adding dried basil takes it down into the bass category.

Mookie the cat sniffs some nepitella
(Cats like the smell of nepitella. Maybe they think it’s catnip?)

Nepitella is definitely in the mint family. It has that high note of mint flavor but with a bass note added; not another high note. Therefore I believe nepitella is more like a combination of both basil and mint. But really, it’s in a class all its own.

When Should You Use Nepitella?

So what do I use it for? There are really only two things I use this herb for: mushrooms and artichokes. Whenever I use mushrooms or artichokes in a recipe, I sprinkle fresh (or in the winter, dried) nepitella on them. It is a perfect compliment.

(You can use fresh or dried nepitella but just like other herbs the dried is stronger because the flavors are more concentrated.)

Where Can You Get Nepitella?

My grandmother brought nepitella seeds back with her from Italy many years ago. She planted them in her garden in Boston and a few years later, nepitella was growing everywhere: in the cracks in the asphalt in her driveway and up against her house as well as in the cracks in the sidewalk around her house.

It is a hearty herb and a pleasant one. What it does is re-seed itself. The green leaves sprout light purple flowers that turn to seed and drop in the ground nearby. And in that way, it spreads itself.

Nepitella growing wild along a fence
(Nepitella spreads quickly and will grow just about anywhere including along this fence.)

I took a few plants from the cracks in her driveway and planted them in my backyard. And now this delightful herb grows wild around my home: just waiting for me to come pluck a handful whenever I’m cooking fried mushrooms or stuffed artichokes.

Surprisingly, nepitella is getting more popular in the States. A search on Google turned up a few articles and places on where you can order it online. Gourmet Magazine once featured a video on its site with an Italian chef explaining “why you’ve got to get this wild Italian herb into your kitchen.”  But then he went and added it to fried crabmeat. That’s a new one on me.

Try These Dishes Using Nepitella

Nepitella and Mushroom Spaghetti: This is a quick and easy meal you can make on a weeknight.

Closeup of spaghetti and mushrooms

 

Stuffed Artichokes: A classic Italian side dish that even the Three Stooges can make and eat.

(Photo courtesy of “Insomnia Cured Here” on Flickr)

 

Mushrooms Stuffed with Nepitella Pesto: A buttery and earthy flavor combination.

Green pesto in ramekin with stuffed mushrooms

Can’t Beet This Vegetarian Dinner

Can’t Beet This Vegetarian Dinner

Root vegetables and eggplant. A healthy, tasty delight.

After work I felt like cooking, so I went shopping and came home and whipped this up in about 90 minutes (I used left over tomato sauce). All of the recipes except for the beet recipe have been posted on Rootsliving. So, I’m posting a link to the beet salad recipe courtesy of Epicurious.

I never liked beets, but now with this recipe, I love them. And they’re good for you too.

Here’s what we ate tonight:

Eggplant Parmesan (follow the recipe here for chicken parm, but omit the sage leaf)

French Peasant Beets

Stuffed Mushrooms with Nepitella Pesto

The combination of these earthy side dishes blended together well. And a glass (or two) of my homemade zinfandel rounded out the meal.

A Must-Have Wild Italian

A Must-Have Wild Italian

This herb grows wild in Tuscany and will grow wild in your backyard too.
This herb grows wild in Tuscany and will grow wild in your backyard too.

Nepitella completes the trifecta of Italian herbs that are a must-have in any Tuscan kitchen. You know about oregano and basil, but what is nepitella?

It’s an herb like no other and one I wouldn’t dream of living without. Some describe it as a cross between oregano and mint, but I believe it’s more like a cross between basil and mint. In reality, it’s in a league by itself.

So what do you use it for and where can you get it? Find out the answers to these questions and more.

More on nepitella at AllThingsTuscan.com

And try this recipe for Nepitella and Mushroom Spaghetti

(Photo by Mark Micheli)